Incongruent Lives: Truth From 2014 - Part 4

by Aaron
Every once in a while through 2015 I am going back to some statistics that came out at the end of 2014 about American’s lives and beliefs. One of the most striking things about most statistics is the difference between what we say and what we do; we call this incongruent. I know a lot of people went all the way through school (like me) and still never learned the meaning of words that were longer than 3 syllables (like me). Incongruent (a dreaded 4 syllable word) means the opposite of something that is congruent. Congruent means, “to agree” and is mostly used in mathematics to mean something that coincides at all points.
 
Incongruent, in our lives, is when we say one thing and do another. Like a study at the end of 2014 which shows that a majority of Americans believe Marijuana, which is another 4 syllable word (so I will use other words that help to identify this substance better such as pot, reefer, cannabis, and weed)… a majority of Americans (58%) believe pot should be legal anywhere and everywhere. The number 58% seems like the people who believe in a “pot nation” is growing, yet even though 58% say it should be legal, the majority also believe it is immoral to use it. Only 47% of American’s think it is OK to smoke (or ingest) pot.
 
This is incongruent.
 
If, and when, we believe something is destructive and wrong we should be willing to stand behind our convictions. This isn’t to say that the people involved in a destructive behavior should be ridiculed or made to feel inferior, but in common discourse we should all have the ability to speak about what we believe (freedom of speech) without fear of repercussions (yes, I know, that word was 4 syllables). This is one of the things America was founded upon, the freedom to be able to question and speak into the realm of ideas and action so as to point to the truth even when people want to squash it.
 
The things I write today could be taken in many different ways, especially with recent Supreme Court decisions, it’s one of the reasons I am talking about pot and not something else. In a society who claims to love truth, we should be able to allow all opinions to be talked about and allow all arguments for and against an issue to be spoken. Unfortunately that is no longer the case. When someone disagrees with a majority position, they are now told to be silent or they will be ridiculed, sued, or slandered. It becomes dangerous when a view about truth and life that has asked for the right to be heard gets heard and then wants to quiet all other voices. It is incongruent.
 
As Christians, believers in the Scriptures, the truth and the hope that they provide, we must be people who live congruent lives. We say what we mean, we live our convictions, we love as we were first loved and bless like we were first blessed. We should want to allow ideas to be spoken so we have the opportunity to engage in discourse that speaks to and reveals the truth, hope, and light of the life changing (and life challenging) message of the Good News of Jesus.
 
  • Psalm 46:1-3 God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble.
    Therefore we will not fear though the earth gives way, though the mountains be moved into the heart of the sea, though its waters roar and foam, though the mountains tremble at its swelling.
     
  • Psalm 27:2-3 When evildoers assail me to eat up my flesh, my adversaries and foes, it is they who stumble and fall. Though an army encamp against me, my heart shall not fear; though war arise against me, yet I will be confident.
 
No matter how incongruent the world around us becomes, we stay congruent with the heart of the message of the Gospel, the same Gospel that WE needed to have life again. Though all around us gives way, we must live the way of Jesus by what we say and by what we do. It matters not what people say about us, it maters what Christ calls us to. As John Piper wrote, “we want people to see us with approval when we are displaying that Jesus is infinitely valuable to us, but we dare not make the opinion of others the measure of our faithfulness.”